Tag Archive wholesale real estate

Trump: China is getting ‘f**king’ Trump’s China deal

August 23, 2021 Comments Off on Trump: China is getting ‘f**king’ Trump’s China deal By admin

President Donald Trump has accused China of getting “f**ked” by his trade deal with China.

Trump, who made his first foreign trip as president, accused the world’s second-largest economy of trying to sabotage the U.S.-China trade deal.

The president was speaking at the opening of a new luxury hotel in Seattle and was on his way to a meeting with the prime minister of Japan.

The deal was struck to free up shipping lanes for American and Chinese goods.

Trump said that the deal, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), is a disaster and that he will be renegotiating the deal.

“It is a total disaster, and I will renegotiate it and renegotiate, and that will happen when we have the strength and the unity of our country,” Trump said.

“This is a major problem for our country.”

Trump is scheduled to meet with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang at the White House later on Thursday.

The White House has not yet released a statement about Trump’s remarks.

Trump’s remarks come after Trump made several controversial comments about China during his first overseas trip.

He called China the world ‘s most oppressive dictatorship’ and said that it has taken advantage of its vast resources to steal U.N. votes.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping met in Hawaii on Monday for their first official face-to-face meeting since the historic deal was announced last month.

Trump has vowed to renegotiate the trade deal if he is elected.

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Why Is the GOP Spending So Much Money on the Housing Bubble?

June 18, 2021 Comments Off on Why Is the GOP Spending So Much Money on the Housing Bubble? By admin

The Republican Party is spending so much money on the housing bubble that it’s now causing a severe housing crisis, a crisis that’s only going to get worse.

The GOP’s housing plan is to subsidize home purchases with taxpayer money, but there are plenty of ways the GOP can be doing just that.

The problem is that there aren’t any easy solutions for the housing crisis.

It’s a long-term problem that requires political will, not just a quick fix.

Here are four ideas that could be good for the economy and for the nation.

1.

Taxpayers should have more say in how much homeowners spend on home purchases.

In the wake of the housing crash, the GOP has spent billions of dollars on “affordable housing” programs, but those programs are largely ineffective and wasteful.

They encourage people to spend more on a home than they should, thereby contributing to the bubble.

They also increase the number of homes being purchased by people who don’t have homes to begin with.

While the federal government does provide a tax credit for those buying a home, that credit is a small fraction of the value of the home, and the real-estate market has been in freefall for some time.

In many areas, the cost of a home is far higher than the tax credit.

That means taxpayers will be stuck with the bill when the housing market goes down.

2.

Reins in mortgage interest payments.

Mortgage interest is a tax that comes out of the government’s coffers and the interest is paid off the loan.

For most people, it’s a small amount that’s taxed in the year of the loan, but for homeowners, it can add up.

The IRS collects mortgage interest tax credits that cover up to $500,000 for a single family mortgage, and that’s not enough to cover the costs of a mortgage.

That’s why Republicans have spent so much time and money on this issue.

If they just paid the mortgage interest, there wouldn’t be a housing bubble.

3.

Eliminate the mortgage-interest deduction.

The deduction for mortgage interest is so small that it could only be used for paying down a mortgage in the first place, not for paying off a mortgage after the loan has been paid off.

For that reason, the Republican Party has long supported eliminating the mortgage deduction.

But it should be easy for homeowners to use the deduction.

A new report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office found that eliminating the deduction would result in an additional $1.4 trillion in savings over a decade.

It would also help to provide a buffer for those who lose their homes.

The biggest problem with eliminating the tax deduction is that it would increase the amount of money the federal budget would need to balance.

That would be especially true for the middle class, because the mortgage tax credit would only be available to people with income of $250,000 or more.

In some cases, the savings would be even greater, because many people earning between $100,000 and $150,000 would benefit from the deduction, and many would qualify for tax credits for housing that are much higher than their income.

4.

End the mortgage credit for first-time homebuyers.

The tax deduction for first time homebuyer mortgages is a good idea, but the problem is it doesn’t work as well as the deduction for mortgages that have been paid down.

The reason is that homeowners who don’s have homes can use the mortgage income to pay down their mortgages without paying tax.

As long as the mortgage is paid in full, the tax benefit for the homeowner doesn’t kick in.

For many people, that’s a huge problem because it means that the government pays down the mortgage, but they don’t pay tax on it.

The Fix’s analysis found that the tax break for first homebuyrs would actually add $500 billion to the federal deficit over a 10-year period.

The real-world consequences of this are complicated, but a recent study from the Brookings Institution estimated that first-homebuyer taxes would add $1 trillion to the national debt over the next decade.

The solution is to eliminate the mortgage subsidy entirely.

3) Cut the cost to purchase a home.

The government currently subsidizes home purchases through the mortgage industry.

Under the mortgage loan program, homebuyters are required to put down at least 80% of the down payment on a house.

The Federal Housing Administration estimates that a 40-year-old with a 30-year mortgage can save up to nearly $30,000 in interest on a 30% down payment, but that same person who has a 10% down would have to pay more than $60,000 more in interest.

In a recent House Budget Committee hearing, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) acknowledged that a higher-income family could save $1,000 to $2,000 annually if they only put down 30% of their down payment.

The housing bubble is a problem because we’ve had so many people with

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